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Vincent:

Hi everyone and welcome back to another quick tip episode. Today we’re going to talk about impostor syndrome.

To learn more about Vyten, check out www.vyten.com, where we help business professionals achieve fulfilling careers with the pay and purpose they deserve.

I remember in the past not doing well in high school and actually getting rejected from every college that I applied to my senior year. Years later, I was wrapping up classes at a community college and getting ready to transfer to UCLA.

The first time that I stepped on my new campus, I remember thinking “what am I doing here?”

At first, I felt like I didn’t belong, and even worse, that I didn’t deserve to be at this school. I was intimidated by all of the other students around me.

In hindsight now, I know that I was experiencing pretty typical feelings of impostor syndrome, by being unable to internalize or accept the success that getting accepted to this school was.

Impostor syndrome is the idea that you’ve only succeeded due to luck, and not because of your talent or qualifications.

I constantly would think about whether others would figure out that I didn’t belong there or that my admission to the school was actually a mistake all along.

If you’ve felt these same feelings of self-doubt, or have had anxiety or depression about the pressure to achieve, then you aren’t alone.

In this video, we’re going to talk about three ways to face impostor feelings while overcoming the belief that you don’t measure up.

First, build a support network and talk to your mentors. Resources like the Vyten Council community are a great place to connect with others and get support as you navigate through your career.

This will help you with realizing that no one is perfect, and everyone makes mistakes. It’s those that learn from these mistakes and apply their learnings that excel in their personal life and career.

Valerie Young, the author of a book called The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women, found that “perfectionists” set really high expectations for themselves, and even if they hit 99% of their goals, they can feel like failures with small mistakes. 

Second, remember what you do well. There are areas today where you excel, and it’s important to remember and recognize these areas while also working on the areas that need improvement. This can help you separate the areas that you are doing well and recognizing legitimate room for improvement.

And lastly, talk to someone who can help. A psychologist or therapist can give you tools to help you break the cycle of impostor syndrome. 

This step can help you acknowledge the thoughts and feelings that you’re having in order to put them into perspective. You can reframe these thoughts. By learning to value constructive criticism, understanding that you can and should ask for help, and understanding that practice can make you better at a skill, you can overcome the feelings of doubt that you may be feeling.

Studies show that 70% of people experience impostor syndrome at some point in their career, so you’re not alone. By following these steps, you can take today as an opportunity to accept and embrace your capabilities.

Wherever you’re watching this video, scroll down and leave a comment for me.

I’ll see you next time.

Links

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Text Vincent: +1 615-667-8433

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